COLLECTION DONATIONS

The museum accepts donations of original comic, cartoon and animation art for its permanent collection, as well as books for its research library. Donating your artwork to the museum ensures that it will be preserved for the enjoyment and education of future generations.

To inquire about art donations, please contact gallery@cartoonart.org.

 

Donations, legacy gifts, and bequests from individual artists and collectors are responsible for the majority of our collection, and are available to the public for both exhibitions and use by scholars or other qualified researchers.

 

THE MUSEUM COLLECTS…

  • Animation artwork, such as character model sheets, drawings and cels

  • Artwork from comic books, comic strips and graphic novels

  • Artwork from underground cartoons and comix

  • Editorial and magazine cartoons

  • Advertising cartoons

  • Tear sheets and printed copies of rare vintage artwork

  • Games and other interactive objects related to cartoons or comics

  • Toys, merchandise, and other 3-D objects related to cartoons or comics

To inquire about art donations, please contact gallery@cartoonart.org.

 
 
 

mclachlan REading room LIBRARY DONATIONs

 

The museum is happy to accept books for the research library archive and reading room, including reference books, how-to books, cartoon collections, cartoonist biographies, and cartoon-related periodicals and other archival materials. In certain cases, rare cartoon books will be accessioned into the permanent collection.

Our current library contains more than 5,000 volumes of graphic novels, anthologies, reference books, how-to guides, catalogues, histories, biographies, encyclopedias, illustrated fiction, and children's books, compiled for the purposes of scholarly research into the history of cartoon and comic art, thanks to generous donations from personal libraries.

To inquire about library donations, please contact gallery@cartoonart.org.

The library collects…

  • Biographies about cartoonists, comic book artists, and animators

  • Cartoon books

  • Graphic novels and anthologies of comic strips or comic books

  • Reference books about cartooning, comics or animation

  • Periodicals and journals about cartooning, comics or animation

  • Recordings or publications about animation music or composers

 

McLachlan Reading Room and Library

 
 

The reading room collects…

  • Biographies about cartoonists, comic book artists, and animators

  • Cartoon books

  • Graphic novels and anthologies of comic strips or comic books

  • Reference books about cartooning, comics or animation

  • Periodicals and journals about cartooning, comics or animation

  • Animation DVDs or CD of animation music

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 
 

CAN I DONATE MY COMIC BOOK COLLECTION?

Due to space restrictions, the museum can only accept a selection of particular comic books for our permanent collection. Certain Golden and Silver Age comic books, as well as some older vintage printed materials are eligible for the archives on a case-by-case basis.

I HAVE AN OLD FLYER THAT I THINK IS ILLUSTRATED BY A FAMOUS CARTOONIST. WILL THE MUSEUM ACCEPT IT?

We accept printed materials for our research library that have a relationship to cartoon or animation art, especially rarities that will be useful to researchers. If you have an unusual item that you think might be of interest, please contact our curator.

DOES THE MUSEUM COLLECT TOYS, ACTION FIGURES OR OTHER CARTOON MERCHANDISE?

Yes, the museum does collect selected merchandise, toys, and other 3-D objects related to cartoons, on a case-by-case basis. If you have memorabilia that you think might be of interest, please contact our curator.

CAN THE MUSEUM TELL ME WHAT MY COLLECTION IS WORTH?

For both ethical and legal reasons, the staff of the museum is not permitted to give appraisals or opinions of monetary value of art or other objects. We recommend that you arrange for an independent appraisal of your cartoon art and objects before considering donation in order to correctly assess the value of your donation for tax purposes. See below for more details on appraisal requirements for tax purposes. Useful sources to consult for determining value include*:

  • Auction catalogs and auction house sites (i.e. Illustration House, Sotheby's, Christie's)

  • Dealers of cartoon art, comic books, or cartoon-related merchandise

  • IRS Publication 561, "Determining the Value of Donated Property"

  • Online auction sites (i.e. eBay)

  • Price Guides and Books on Collectibles

  • Robert M. Overstreet, The Official Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide

*Inclusion on this list in no way implies an endorsement or recommendation by the Cartoon Art Museum.

WHAT ARE THE TAX BENEFITS OF DONATING?

The Cartoon Art Museum is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) organization. The fair-market value of any donation is tax-deductible. The fair-market value is defined as "the price at which the property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, neither being under any compulsion to buy or sell, and both having reasonable knowledge of relevant facts." – Income Tax Regs. Sec. 1.170A-1(c)(2)

DOES THE IRS REQUIRE AN APPRAISAL OF MY DONATION?

If you claim a total deduction of $500 or less for all contributed property, you do not need to attach any special forms to your tax return. If you donate personal property worth between $501 and $5,000, the IRS requires Form 8283, Non-cash Charitable Contributions to be filed with your tax return, but it does not need to be signed by the museum. You do not need a professional appraisal but you must report how the fair-market value was determined. Evidence of contemporary sales of similar pieces is generally sufficient.

If the donated item or group of similar items exceeds $5,000 in value, the IRS requires a professional appraisal. As an interested party, the Cartoon Art Museum is not permitted to provide or arrange the appraisal. IRS Form 8283, Non-cash Charitable Contributions must be attached to your income tax return and signed by both the appraiser and the museum.

If your total art contribution deduction exceeds $20,000, you must attach a complete copy of the signed appraisal along with IRS Form 8283, Non-cash Charitable Contributions. You can download Form 8283 from the Internal Revenue Service's website: https://www.irs.gov/.

WHAT DOCUMENTATION DOES THE MUSEUM PROVIDE?

For every donation, the museum provides a letter stating what the gift was and when it was received by the museum. The donor should keep this letter as a receipt of the gift for their tax records. For any donation of stock, art, books, or other gifts-in-kind to the Cartoon Art Museum, the fair-market value is tax-deductible.

 
 

The Cartoon Art Museum Collections

The Cartoon Art Museum is home to over 6,000 pieces of original artwork, including cartoons, comic books, comic strips, editorial cartoons, concept sketches, color roughs, and tear sheets. The Cartoon Art Museum is also one of very few museums worldwide with a permanent collection of original animation art. Animation holdings include cels, drawings, background paintings and illustrations from TV series and films produced by Warner Bros., Walt Disney Co., Filmation, Nevlana Studios and Hanna-Barbera, among many others.

Various selections from our permanent collection are displayed in the museum on a rotating basis through curated exhibitions. Certain selections are also currently available as traveling exhibitions.

To discuss hosting a traveling exhibition or to speak to our curator about exhibition services, contact gallery@cartoonart.org

 

The Malcolm Whyte Collection

Cartoon Art Museum founder Malcolm Whyte has donated dozens of original comic strips and comic book pages from his personal collection to the museum’s archives, including comic strips from the late 19th to mid 20th Century.

Charles Schulz, Cartoon Art Museum Collector’s Print, 1987

Charles and Jean Schulz Collection

Charles and Jean Schulz were among the Cartoon Art Museum’s first and most dedicated supporters, in both financial and moral support. Charles “Sparky” Schulz donated dozens of pieces of original Peanuts artwork to the museum during its first decade of operation, for both fundraising auctions and to build the museum’s archives.

Bill Crawford, editorial cartoon, ca. 1960

The Bill Crawford Collection

The Cartoon Art Museum houses over 50 political cartoons illustrated by award-winning cartoonist Bill Crawford in the 1960s. These works were donated by his widow, Claire Crawford, in 2002.

Morrie Turner, Wee Pals, 1987

The Morrie Turner Collection

Wee Pals comic strip creator and Bay Area native Morrie Turner was a longtime friend of CAM founder Malcolm Whyte, and was a regular donor of original artwork to the museum’s permanent collection.

John Severin, Rawhide Kid: Slap Leather #1, 2003

The John Severin Collection

Artist John Severin was a generous supporter of the museum’s archives. His donations include covers and stories from Cracked magazine, a complete Enemy Ace short story drawn for DC Comics, and the entirety of the five-issue miniseries Rawhide Kid: Slap Leather, published by Marvel Comics.

TAD Dorgan, Judge Rummy, 1922

The Bill Janocha Collection

Cartoonist and historian Bill Janocha has served as Mort Walker’s assistant on the Beetle Bailey comic strip since 1987. An avid collector of original comic strip artwork, Janocha has generously donated dozens of comics from his own archives.

Wiley Smith, Football Follies, 1961

The Wiley Smith Collection

California native Wiley Smith was best known for his regular features Life with Homer and Football Follies, featured in the San Francisco Examiner from the 1930s to the 1960s. His family donated an extensive collection of his work to the Cartoon Art Museum in 1994.

Phil Frank, Farley, 1986

The Phil Frank Collection

Farley comic strip creator Phil Frank was one of the Cartoon Art Museum’s earliest supporters, and he regularly donated his own artwork to the museum’s permanent collection, and created many illustrations for museum fundraising events and auctions.

Lou Grant, editorial cartoon, 1960s

The Lou Grant Collection

The famed Oakland Tribune editorial cartoonist Lou Grant’s widow, Florenzi Grant, donated a number of original cartoons to the museum’s archives.

Bil Keane, The Family Circus, 1986

The Bil Keane Collection

Reuben Award-winning cartoonist Bil Keane, creator of the beloved Family Circus comic strip, was a longtime friend and supporter of the Cartoon Art Museum. The Bil Keane collection houses more than 40 of his original cartoons dating back to the early 1960s.

James Dickie, “How To Draw Dogs,” 1960s

The James Dickie Collection

The prolific children's book illustrator and cartoonist James Dickie spent much of his professional career in Oakland, and was the staff cartoonist for the Oakland Tribune for nearly three decades. A selection of original artwork from his archives was generously donated by the artist’s family in 1986.

Sharon Smith (Kane), Buttons an’ Beaux, 1950

The Sharon Smith Kane Collection

At age 17, cartoonist Sharon Smith launched a syndicated panel called Buttons an' Beaux, which humorously documented the trials and tribulations of teenage life in the early 1950s. Smith retired the feature in 1952, but went on to a long and successful career as a children's book illustrator. In 2018, under her married name of Sharon Smith Kane, the artist donated over 250 original Buttons an' Beaux comics to the Cartoon Art Museum's archives.

Jeff Stahler, editorial cartoon, 1997

The Jeff Stahler Collection

Editorial cartoonist Jeff Stahler began his career with the Columbus Citizen Journal in 1983, then served as staff cartoonist for the Cincinnati Post from 1985–2005, and the Columbus Dispatch from 2005– 2011, before launching a successful career as a syndicated cartoonist with Universal UClick. The Jeff Stahler Collection contains more than 100 original editorial cartoons featuring the artist's work for the Cincinnati Post during the 1990s.

Alex Anderson, Crusader Rabbit animation art, ca. 1950

The Alex Anderson Collection

Animator Alex Anderson donated artwork from his groundbreaking cartoon series Crusader Rabbit as well as the animation camera that he used for production of that cartoon and Rocky and Bullwinkle in 2002. The animation camera is now on view in the Cartoon Art Museum lobby.

Mort Walker, Beetle Bailey, 1992

Mort Walker and the International Museum of Cartoon Art collection

Best known for his internationally syndicated comic strip Beetle Bailey, Mort Walker founded the International Museum of Cartoon Art in 1974, and the success of that institution helped to inspire the creation of San Francisco’s Cartoon Art Museum a decade later. When the IMCA ceased operations, Walker donated more than 100 highlights from that museum’s original comic strip art collection to the Cartoon Art Museum’s archives.

Walt Disney Animation, Donald Duck, ca. 1935

Mike and Jeanne Glad Collection

Longtime Cartoon Art Museum supporter and world-renowned animation authority Mike Glad has donated hundreds of animation cels, backgrounds, and illustrations to the Cartoon Art Museum over the past three decades, including classic works from Disney, Hanna-Barbera, and Warner Bros., among other studios.

Sal Buscema, Avengers Annual #17, 1988

The Graham Nash Collection

Musician and art enthusiast Graham Nash has donated more than 100 pieces of original cartoon art from his own personal collection, with an emphasis on comic book artwork.

Bill Schorr, editorial cartoon, 1985

The Bill Schorr Collection

The Cartoon Art Museum houses over 200 political cartoons illustrated by award-winning cartoonist Bill Schorr in the mid-1990s.

Dick Wright, editorial cartoon, 1987

The Dick Wright Collection

The Cartoon Art Museum houses over 300 political cartoons illustrated by famed cartoonist Dick Wright in the mid-1990s.

Eldon Dedini, Playboy cartoon, 1981

The Eldon Dedini Collection

California-based cartoonist Eldon Dedini, best known for his magazine cartoons in publications including Playboy and The New Yorker, was a longtime friend and supporter of the Cartoon Art Museum. In 2006, Dedini’s son donated more than a dozen of his father’s original magazine cartoons.

Heavy Metal, “Taarna,” animation cel, 1981

The Heavy Metal Collection

Collector Robert Gardella donated an extensive collection of concept art, pencil drawings, animation cels and backgrounds from the 1980 animated classic Heavy Metal, along with a complete collection of Heavy Metal magazine from its initial publication in 1977 through 2007.

Chester Gould, Dick Tracy, 1948

The Jerry Robinson Collection

Artist Jerry Robinson was best known for his work on the Batman comic books in the early 1940s, including the co-creation of Robin and The Joker. His widow, Gro, and son, Jens, donated more than 100 pieces of original artwork from Jerry’s archives in 2011.

Rob Rogers, editorial cartoon, 1991

The Rob Rogers Collection

The Cartoon Art Museum houses over 300 political cartoons illustrated by award-winning cartoonist Rob Rogers in the mid-1990s.

Rick Hackney, Sir Bagby, 1960s

The Rick Hackney Collection

Rick and Bill Hackney’s syndicated comic strip Sir Bagby appeared in newspapers from 1959 to 1966. The California-based artist donated more than 100 pieces of original artwork from the beloved strip to the Cartoon Art Museum in 2007.

The Corka Collection

Zena Kavin, along with her husband, Jon, published cartoons in the Saturday Evening Post and The New Yorker under the pseudonym Corka.  A substantial number of their cartoons and preparatory drawings were donated to the Cartoon Art Museum in 2003.

Mike Luckovich, editorial cartoon, 1989

The Mike Luckovich Collection

The Cartoon Art Museum houses over 300 political cartoons illustrated by Pulitzer Award-winning cartoonist Mike Luckovich in the mid-1990s.

Image credits:

Charles Schulz, Cartoon Art Museum Collector’s Print, 1987 | Alex Anderson, Crusader Rabbit animation art, ca. 1950 | Mort Walker, Beetle Bailey, 1992 | Bill Crawford, editorial cartoon, ca. 1960 | Walt Disney Animation, Donald Duck, ca. 1935 | Morrie Turner, Wee Pals, 1987 | Sal Buscema, Avengers Annual #17, 1988 | John Severin, Rawhide Kid: Slap Leather #1, 2003 | Bill Schorr, editorial cartoon, 1985 | TAD Dorgan, Judge Rummy, 1922 | Dick Wright, editorial cartoon, 1987 | Wiley Smith, Football Follies, 1961 | Eldon Dedini, Playboy cartoon, 1981 | Phil Frank, Farley, 1986 | Heavy Metal, “Taarna,” animation cel, 1981 | Lou Grant, editorial cartoon, 1960s | Chester Gould, Dick Tracy, 1948 | Bil Keane, The Family Circus, 1986 | Rob Rogers, editorial cartoon, 1991 | James Dickie, “How To Draw Dogs,” 1960s | Rick Hackney, Sir Bagby, 1960s | Sharon Smith (Kane), Buttons an’ Beaux, 1950 | Mike Luckovich, editorial cartoon, 1989 | Jeff Stahler, editorial cartoon, 1997